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The Return of Larry Fitzgerald

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The combination of Kevin Kolb, John Skelton, Ryan Lindley and even Brian Hoyer led Arizona Cardinals wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald to suffer through his most challenging season since his rookie year in 2004. Only Lindley (who holds the NFL record for most passes in the regular season without a touchdown) remains on Arizona's roster after the organization completely revamped the quaterback position. 

With the addition of Carson Palmer, the Cardinals have significantly upgraded the position. Unlike last season, there will be no question who will start under center. 

And an upgrade at the quarterback position also translates into an upgrade for the wideouts. This is especially true for Fitzgerald.

Last season, Fitzgerald put up a dismal 71/798/4 stat line, and only averaged 49.9 yards per game. With Palmer tossing him the rock, he will get back to eclipsing 1,000 yards and inch closer to the 8-10 touchdown range. 

And Kent Somers of azcentral.com dropped this little nugget on us:

Screen Shot_2013-08-04_at_5.38.55_AM

The "some kind of treatment" was for "irritation of the fatty pad under the patellar tendon." Sounds bad. What sounds worse is that fellow running back Rashard Mendenhall is currently fighting with tendinitis in his knee. 

If the Cardinals generate any offense, it's likely to flow through Fitzgerald. New head coach Bruce Arians recognizes where the focal point of his offense is, as well.

Arians has the future Hall of Famer learning three of the wide receiver positions ("X", "Z" and "F"), exactly what Reggie Wayne did in the 2012 season. It worked for Wayne last year and it should work for Fitzgerald this year.  

Once Palmer signed his 3-year, $26 million contract ($10 million guaranteed) on April 2, 2013, Fitzgerald's ADP shot up from the fifth round to the mid-third round. Fitz makes it possible for fantasy owners to land a legitimate WR1 (potentially a top-5 WR) and still stick to this year's trend of grabbing a couple of running backs in the first two rounds.

Cedric Hopkins

Cedric Hopkins Bio

 I attended the University of New Mexico and played basketball for the Lobos. After back-packing in Europe for a spell, I decided to attend law school. After graduation, I worked for a small firm in San Diego, CA then moved to Tucson where I opened my law practice, The Hopkins Law Office, P.C. I specialize in writing appeals in criminal and civil matters at the state and federal level.

For years, I have researched and written about legal issues but maintained a love for sports. With FieldandCourt.com, I am combining my two passions and researching and writing about sports. When I'm not in court arguing my case before a judge, I'll be doing the same with my articles on FieldandCourt.com.

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Featured Writer

Cedric Hopkins

I attended the University of New Mexico and played basketball for the Lobos. After back-packing in Europe for a spell, I decided to attend law school. After graduation, I worked for a small firm in San Diego, CA then moved to Tucson where I opened my law practice, The Hopkins Law Office, P.C. I specialize in writing appeals in criminal and civil matters at the state and federal level.

For years, I have researched and written about legal issues but maintained a love for sports. With FieldandCourt.com, I am combining my two passions by researching and writing about sports. When I'm not in court arguing my case before a judge, I'll be doing the same with my articles on FieldandCourt.com.