Wes Welker Says Negotiations With New England Patriots 'Worse' Than Before

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Just days after signing his franchise tender, things have worsened for New England Patriots wide receiver Wes Welker.

 

"There have been talks, but nothing that's brightened anything at all," Welker told Karen Guregian of the Boston Herald. "It’s actually gotten worse."

Prior to signing his franchise tender, Welker had the option of holding out until well into the off-season. Teams have until July 16 to sign their franchise players to long-term deals.

Welker—in signing his franchise tender—chose to take a leap of faith.

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Apparently, doing the right thing may not get the right results.

 

According to Welker, the Patriots have lowered the two-year, fully guaranteed $16 million offer that they initially proposed to something less. As it stands now, Welker is guaranteed $9.5 million for only next season after signing his tender.

When contemplating whether he should holdout or not, Welker took the Patriots' style into consideration. 

 

"I think those techniques [holding out] work better with other teams. I think the best thing you can do, as far as the Patriots, is be there and let them make the decision if they want to do something long-term or not," Welker said. 

While the Patriots may want Welker on the receiving end of quarterback Tom Brady's passes, they may not value him as much as they did earlier.

The Patriots have signed free agents Brandon Lloyd, Anthony Gonzalez, Donte Stallworth, and seventh-round rookie Jeremy Ebert, to go along with their already rostered veterans Deion Branch, Chad Ochocinco, Matthew Slater and Julian Edelman.  

Despite how crowded the wide receiver elevator may be in New England, Welker is an integral piece to the Patriots puzzle. If the Pats and Welker can't work out a multi-year deal, then expect to see Welker donning a different uniform in 2013.  

 

Cedric Hopkins

Cedric Hopkins Bio

Cedric Hopkins runs this sports law/fantasy football blog. If you have issues with it, it's all his fault. Cedric was an athlete-student at the University of New Mexico (Basketball - Go Lobos!). He then morphed into a student-athlete when he attended law school in San Diego. Age replaced athleticism and now he writes appellate briefs for criminals (alleged criminals, of course) in state and federal cases, including writing U.S. Supreme Court briefs.

For years Cedric has researched and written about legal issues but maintained a love for sports. With FieldandCourt.com, he's combining his two passions: researching and writing about sports. When he's not in court arguing a case before a judge (or writing about himself in the third person), he'll be doing the same with his articles on FieldandCourt.com. Follow me, er, him on Twitter (opens in a new window).

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Cedric Hopkins

Cedric Hopkins runs this sports law/fantasy football blog. If you have issues with it, it's all his fault. Cedric was an athlete-student at the University of New Mexico (Basketball - Go Lobos!). He then morphed into a student-athlete when he attended law school in San Diego. Age replaced athleticism and now he writes appellate briefs for criminals (alleged criminals, of course) in state and federal cases, including writing U.S. Supreme Court briefs.

For years Cedric has researched and written about legal issues but maintained a love for sports. With FieldandCourt.com, he's combining his two passions: researching and writing about sports. When he's not in court arguing a case before a judge (or writing about himself in the third person), he'll be doing the same with his articles on FieldandCourt.com. Follow me, er, him on Twitter (opens in a new window).